lachesism

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the desire to be struck by disaster—to survive a plane crash, to lose everything in a fire, to plunge over a waterfall—which would put a kink in the smooth arc of your life, and forge it into something hardened and flexible and sharp, not just a stiff prefabricated beam that barely covers the gap between one end of your life and the other.

silicongarden:

protocells - the beginning of life.Martin Hanczyc: The line between life and not-life

itsfullofstars:

Isao Tomita, 1984: Space Walk - Impressions Of An Astronaut (compilation album).

Isao Tomita (冨田 勲 Tomita Isao?, born April 22, 1932), often known simply as Tomita, is a Japanese music composer, regarded as one of the pioneers of electronic music and space music, and as one of the most famous producers of analog synthesizer arrangements. In addition to creating note-by-note realizations, Tomita made extensive use of the sound design capabilities of his instrument, using synthesizers to create new artificial sounds to accompany and enhance his electronic realizations of acoustic instruments. He also made effective use of analog music sequencers and featured futuristic science fiction themes, while laying the foundations for synth-pop music and trance-like rhythms. He also received four Grammy Award nominations for his album Snowflakes are Dancing in 1974.

jtotheizzoe:

I get this question a lot: "Should I go get a PhD?" (or its variant, “How can I get a PhD in X?”) This is just one small part of my answer to that question (we’ll dig in more in the future, I promise). It’s very important that people see this graph before taking the plunge. This isn’t me telling you no, just something you should know about this game, should you choose to play it. I don’t mean to depress you, but we need to do some Real Talk™. 

The chart above details the biggest problem with science and engineering PhD education as it currently stands (via this article). It speaks for itself, but here’s the caption:

Since 1982, almost 800,000 PhDs were awarded in science and engineering (S&E) fields, whereas only about 100,000 academic faculty positions were created in those fields within the same time frame. The number of S&E PhDs awarded annually has also increased over this time frame, from ~19,000 in 1982 to ~36,000 in 2011. The number of faculty positions created each year, however, has not changed, with roughly 3,000 new positions created annually.

If you want to be a professor, or on faculty in any way, then get ready for the Shitty Hunger Games. It’s like the regular Hunger Games, except the odds are in no one’s favor.

There’s certainly lots you can do with a PhD besides be professor (I’m living proof of that). That’s the #1 defense to this kind of data. But I have never seen a convincing case that getting a PhD is something that you need to get if you’re not going to be a prof. Yes, you will be a better thinker/scientist/banker/general human being, but you don’t strictly need to suffer through a PhD to do that. Prove me wrong! I would love to see data that says otherwise because I don’t like this thought!
I don’t think it makes sense for this many people to miss out on years of earning potential and join our magical monkhood for the purpose of receiving some set of special powers and a funny hat. At least not as PhDs are currently designed (and changing that would be something indeed, although yes, please change that).
Because right now, the vast majority of PhD programs train people to be professors, which makes perfect sense because 100% of their mentors decided to go that route. Yes, grad programs are getting better at expanding what PhD students learn and prepping students for alternative careers, but that still strikes me as kind of a joke …
Because faculty jobs ARE the alternative career, people.

jtotheizzoe:

I get this question a lot: "Should I go get a PhD?" (or its variant, “How can I get a PhD in X?”) This is just one small part of my answer to that question (we’ll dig in more in the future, I promise). It’s very important that people see this graph before taking the plunge. This isn’t me telling you no, just something you should know about this game, should you choose to play it. I don’t mean to depress you, but we need to do some Real Talk™. 

The chart above details the biggest problem with science and engineering PhD education as it currently stands (via this article). It speaks for itself, but here’s the caption:

Since 1982, almost 800,000 PhDs were awarded in science and engineering (S&E) fields, whereas only about 100,000 academic faculty positions were created in those fields within the same time frame. The number of S&E PhDs awarded annually has also increased over this time frame, from ~19,000 in 1982 to ~36,000 in 2011. The number of faculty positions created each year, however, has not changed, with roughly 3,000 new positions created annually.

If you want to be a professor, or on faculty in any way, then get ready for the Shitty Hunger Games. It’s like the regular Hunger Games, except the odds are in no one’s favor.

There’s certainly lots you can do with a PhD besides be professor (I’m living proof of that). That’s the #1 defense to this kind of data. But I have never seen a convincing case that getting a PhD is something that you need to get if you’re not going to be a prof. Yes, you will be a better thinker/scientist/banker/general human being, but you don’t strictly need to suffer through a PhD to do that. Prove me wrong! I would love to see data that says otherwise because I don’t like this thought!

I don’t think it makes sense for this many people to miss out on years of earning potential and join our magical monkhood for the purpose of receiving some set of special powers and a funny hat. At least not as PhDs are currently designed (and changing that would be something indeed, although yes, please change that).

Because right now, the vast majority of PhD programs train people to be professors, which makes perfect sense because 100% of their mentors decided to go that route. Yes, grad programs are getting better at expanding what PhD students learn and prepping students for alternative careers, but that still strikes me as kind of a joke …

Because faculty jobs ARE the alternative career, people.

(via crookedindifference)

futuramb:

By PARAG KHANNA, nytimes.com

SIN­GA­PORE — EVERY five years, the Unit­ed States Nation­al Intel­li­gence Coun­cil, which advis­es the direc­tor of the Cen­tral Intel­li­gence Agency, pub­lish­es a report fore­cast­ing the long-term impli­ca­tions of glob­al trends. Ear­li­er…

This is a development we have talked about a lot, but which is hard to grasp and see from a bottom up perspective. It is a development which is happening fragmented and in steps… Sometimes, like e g during the financial crisis in 2008 it even seemed to go in reverse, hand in hand with the globalization. I don’t think it stopping but actually accelerating…

(via techspotlight)

In Other Words, Dept.

thesobsister:

Translation, particularly of ancient literature, interests me.  The rendering into modern or archaic English of texts whose significance and resonance to their contemporary audiences we can only sketch.  The knife’s-edge walk between fidelity and flair.  But more than that, the simple ability to reach back 2,500 years and hear the voices and grapple with the thoughts of those who have not walked in the sun’s bright since those days.

As an example, following are the first eight lines of Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, spoken by the night-watchman.  Four translations follow these, the first by Herbert Weir Smith, the classicist and author of Greek Grammar, the second by the poet and translator Richmond Lattimore, the third by poet Ted Hughes and the fourth by poet and classicist Anne Carson (all rights to the respective holders).

θεοὺς μὲν αἰτῶ τῶνδ᾽ ἀπαλλαγὴν πόνων
φρουρᾶς ἐτείας μῆκος, ἣν κοιμώμενος
στέγαις Ἀτρειδῶν ἄγκαθεν, κυνὸς δίκην,
ἄστρων κάτοιδα νυκτέρων ὁμήγυριν,
καὶ τοὺς φέροντας χεῖμα καὶ θέρος βροτοῖς
λαμπροὺς δυνάστας, ἐμπρέποντας αἰθέρι
ἀστέρας, ὅταν φθίνωσιν, ἀντολάς τε τῶν.

H. Weir Smyth translation (1926):

Release from this weary task of mine has been my cry unto the gods throughout my long year’s watch, wherein, couchant upon the palace roof of the Atreidae, upon my bended arm, like a hound, I have learned to know aright the conclave of the stars of night, yea those radiant potentates conspicuous in the firmament, bringers of winter and summer unto mankind, the constellations, what time they wane and rise.

Richmond Lattimore translation (1953):

I ask the gods some respite from the weariness
of this watchtime measured by years I lie awake
elbowed upon the Atreidae’s roof dogwise to mark
the grand processionals of all the stars of night
burdened with winter and again with heat for men,
dynasties in their shining blazoned on the air,
these stars, upon their wane and when the rest arise.

Ted Hughes translation (1998):

You Gods in heaven -
You have watched me here on this tower
All night, every night for twelve months,
Thirteen moons -
Tethered on the roof of this palace
Like a dog.
It is time to release me.
I’ve stared long enough into this darkness
For what never emerges.
I’m tired of the constellations -
That glittering parade of lofty rulers
Night after night a little bit earlier
Withholding the thing I wait for -
Slow as torture.

Anne Carson translation (2009):

Gods! Free me from this grind!
It’s one long year I’m lying here watching
   waiting watching waiting—
propped on the roof of Atreus, chin on my
    paws like a dog.
I’ve peered at the congregation of the
    nightly stars—bright powerful creatures
    blazing in air,
the ones that bring summer, the ones that
    bring winter,
the ones that die out, the ones that rise
    up—

Which, I think you’ll agree, is quite a diverse set of readings.  What’s the literal translation of the text?  Here’s your sobsister’s rough rendering of the lines:

The gods I ask deliverance from this drudgery,
my full year’s watch, lying, dog-fashion,
on my arm on the roof of the Atreides,
and I contemplated the assembly of night stars,
those radiant rulers bringing summer and winter to man,
conspicuous stars in heaven,
whenever their setting or rising.

Have I mentioned that I’d make Greek and Latin compulsory through all four years of high school?  This is our cultural patrimony.  To read it, even haltingly, in the original is one way in which our species defeats Death.  As you’ll have seen, translation is an art and a space where the poet and technician can meet and strike brilliant sparks.  But to hear and understand the words in one’s own head, even if chipped one by one out of the text’s dark walls as beginners such as myself must do, that is truly  a treat.

techspotlight:

The UK’s National Crime Agency, dubbed ‘the UK’s FBI’, will launch on Monday with a heavy focus on using digital technology to tackle a range of crimes connected to the internet. The £450m NCA is dedicated to battling major problems now connected to cybercrime, including drugs, paedophilia and people trafficking, and replaces the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA), according to the Mail On Sunday. Officers from the unit will investigate unregulated hidden crime areas of the internet dubbed the ‘dark web’ and much of the agency’s work will rely on digital technology. The NCA’s first director-general, Keith Bristow, told the Mail on Sunday: “Very little of what we’re going to do does not involve a digital element.

thesobsister:

Ethel Waters, “Sweet Georgia Brown”

smarterplanet:

Paul Papas, Global Leader, IBM Global Business Services

Paul Papas, Global Leader, IBM Global Business Services

By Paul Papas

Earlier this week, IBM and Boston Children’s Hospital offered a glimpse into the transformative potential of social networking technologies with the unveiling of OPENPediatrics, the world’s first social learning platform designed to connect clinicians from around the world to share knowledge and best practices in the care of critically ill children – all supported on the cloud.

It was a single phone call to Dr. Jeffrey Burns that became the genesis for OPENPediatrics.  After helping a pediatrician in Guatemala successfully treat a young girl with a life-threatening blood disorder, all by using a video link, he aspired to bring world-class critical care to other pediatricians and their patients in every corner of the world.

(via techspotlight)

By the time Josephine Baker retired from the New York City Health Department in 1923, she was famous across the nation for saving the lives of 90,000 inner-city children. The public health measures she implemented, many still in use today, have saved the lives of millions more worldwide.

(Source: the-feature)